• Social Studies Courses

  • Economics

    REGISTER NOW: ECONOMICS


    Course Description

    Course Cost: $300.00 - Credit: .5

    Meet with your campus counselor before you register for an online course.

    Course Materials:

    No textbook required.

    Course Description:

    The course is Project Based and is divided into three projects.

    Economics is the study of how societies deal with the problem of scarcity, i.e. not enough goods and services to satisfy everyone's wants and needs. To understand this problem, students will study the market system, other economic systems, business organizations, supply and demand, money and the banking system, economic growth, governments taxing and spending policies, monetary and fiscal policy and international trade.

    Course Outline:

    • Unit 1 - Introductory Unit
    • Project 1 - Urban Survivor
    • Project 2 - Building a Business
    • Project 3 - Island Adventure

    Detailed Course Syllabus and Correlations to State and National Standards


    REGISTER NOW: ECONOMICS

  • Personal Financial Literacy

    REGISTER NOW: PERSONAL FINANCIAL LITERACY


    Course Description

    Credit: .5

    Meet with your campus counselor before you register for an online course.

    Course Materials:

    No textbook required.

    Course Description:

    Personal Financial Literacy consists of six instructional units:

    • Money & You
    • Managing Your Money
    • Saving & Investing
    • Credit & Borrowing
    • Insuring & Protecting
    • Life After High School

    In this course, you will learn the basics of managing your money now and after you graduate from high school. Budgeting, assets and liabilities, net worth, obtaining and using credit, insurance, buying a car and a home, investing, and saving for retirement are all explored in Personal Financial Literacy. After exploring your own relationship with money, you will choose a car to buy and an apartment to rent, as well as learn how to manage your money so you can pay for these things. Each of the six content units includes a set of vocabulary words, instructional lessons, ungraded self-checks, and a unit quiz. The skills and knowledge you will gain through Personal Financial Literacy will directly impact your life as soon as you step outside your high school and into “real life.”

    Detailed Course Syllabus and Correlations to State and National Standards


    REGISTER NOW: PERSONAL FINANCIAL LITERACY

  • Psychology

    REGISTER NOW: PSYCHOLOGY


    Course Description

    Course Cost: $300.00 - Credit: .5

    Meet with your campus counselor before you register for an online course.

    Course Materials:

    No textbook required.

    Course Description:

    Content of this elective course in Psychology consider the development of the individual and the personality. The course is divided into seven units. The study of psychology is based on a historical framework and relies on effective collection and analysis of data. Students study topics such as theories of human development, personality, motivation, and learning. Students are provided opportunities to acquire, develop, and master specific skills. These skills will be developed through a variety of assignments and activities such as research skills, critical thinking and analytical reasoning, and use of primary and secondary sources.

    Detailed Course Syllabus and Correlations to State and National Standards


    REGISTER NOW: PSYCHOLOGY

  • United States Government

    REGISTER NOW: US GOVERNMENT


    Course Description

    Course Cost: $300.00 - Credit: .5

    Meet with your campus counselor before you register for an online course.

    Course Materials:

    No textbook required.

    Course Description:

    This required course in United States Government includes the basic structure and function of the American Federal Republic, a citizen’s role within the democratic political process, and the study of our Constitution. The course is divided into fourteen units with the primary focus on our national government. U.S. Governmental structure, duties, and powers at the state and local levels will be taught. Students who successfully complete this class will have an understanding of and be prepared to participate in the democratic process at both the national, state, and local levels.

    Detailed Course Syllabus and Correlations to State and National Standards


    REGISTER NOW: US GOVERNMENT

  • United States History - Semester 1

    REGISTER NOW: US HISTORY - SEMESTER 1


    Course Description

    Course Cost: $300.00 - Credit: .5

    Meet with your campus counselor before you register for an online course.

    Course Materials:

    No textbook required.

    Course Description:

    This required course in United States History includes significant events, issues, and problems after the period of Reconstruction, emphasizing present-day issues, which have their roots in the past. The course is divided into 5 units. This course builds upon knowledge and concepts, acquired in the first course (8th grade). The course includes historical concepts, citizenship principles and skills necessary for the study of U.S. History. This course will focus on a program that will foster students’ responsibility for scholarship by providing opportunities for students to acquire, develop, and master specific skills. These skills will be developed through a variety of assignments, projects, and activities such as research, critical thinking and analytical reasoning, and use of primary and secondary sources.

    A foundation in history enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nations.

    Detailed Course Syllabus and Correlations to State and National Standards


    REGISTER NOW: US HISTORY - SEMESTER 1

  • United States History - Semester 2

    REGISTER NOW: US HISTORY - SEMESTER 2


    Course Description

    Course Cost: $300.00 - Credit: .5

    Meet with your campus counselor before you register for an online course.

    Course Materials:

    No textbook required.

    Course Description:

    Content of this required course in United States history includes significant events, issues, and problems from WWII to the presidential administration of George W. Bush. The course is divided into seven units. This course builds upon knowledge and concepts, acquired in the first course (8th grade). The course includes historical concepts, citizenship principles, and skills necessary for the study of U. S. History. This course will focus on a program that will foster students’ responsibility for scholarship by providing opportunities for students to acquire, develop, and master specific skills. These skills will be developed through a variety of assignments and activities such as research skills, critical thinking and analytical reasoning, and use of primary and secondary sources.

    A foundation in history enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nations.

    Detailed Course Syllabus and Correlations to State and National Standards


    REGISTER NOW: US HISTORY - SEMESTER 2

  • World Geography - Semester 1

    REGISTER NOW: WORLD GEOGRAPHY - SEMESTER 1


    Course Description

    Course Cost: $300.00 - Credit: .5

    Meet with your campus counselor before you register for an online course.

    Course Materials:

    No textbook required.

    Course Description:

    The first semester of World Geography introduces students to geography concepts in the study of Europe, the US and Canada, and Latin America. The second semester develops this understanding in the study of Russia, Southwest Asia, South Asia, Southeast and East Asia and Oceania. Students will examine the climate, culture, and development status as well as researching current issues. Students will demonstrate understanding through quizzes, written reflection and a semester-long creative project.

    In World Geography, students examine people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international scales from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography. Students describe the influence of geography on events of the past and present.

    A portion of the course centers around the physical processes that shape patterns in the physical environment; the characteristics of major land forms, climates, and ecosystems and their interrelationships; the political, economic, and social processes that shape cultural patterns of regions; types and patterns of settlement; the distribution and movement of world population; relationships among people, places, and environments; and the concept of region.

    Students analyze how location affects economic activities in different economic systems throughout the world. Students identify the processes that influence political divisions of the planet and analyze how different points of view affect the development of public policies. Students compare how components of culture shape the characteristics of regions and analyze the impact of technology and human modifications on the physical environment. Students use problem-solving and decision-making skills to ask and answer geographic questions.

    Detailed Course Syllabus and Correlations to State and National Standards


    REGISTER NOW: WORLD GEOGRAPHY - SEMESTER 1

  • World Geography - Semester 2

    REGISTER NOW: WORLD GEOGRAPHY - SEMESTER 2


    Course Description

    Course Cost: $300.00 - Credit: .5

    Meet with your campus counselor before you register for an online course.

    Course Materials:

    No textbook required.

    Course Description:

    The second semester of World Geography introduces students to geography concepts in the study of Northern Eurasia, Southwest Asia, South Asia, East and Southeast Asia, and Africa. Students will examine the climate, culture, and development status as well as researching current issues. Students will demonstrate understanding through quizzes, written reflection and a semester-long creative project.

    Students examine people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international scales from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography. Students describe the influence of geography on events of the past and present.

    A portion of the course centers around the physical processes that shape patterns in the physical environment; the characteristics of major land forms, climates, and ecosystems and their interrelationships; the political, economic, and social processes that shape cultural patterns of regions; types and patterns of settlement; the distribution and movement of world population; relationships among people, places, and environments; and the concept of region.

    Students analyze how location affects economic activities in different economic systems throughout the world. Students identify the processes that influence political divisions of the planet and analyze how different points of view affect the development of public policies. Students compare how components of culture shape the characteristics of regions and analyze the impact of technology and human modifications on the physical environment. Students use problem-solving and decision-making skills to ask and answer geographic questions.

    Detailed Course Syllabus and Correlations to State and National Standards


    REGISTER NOW: WORLD GEOGRAPHY - SEMESTER 2

  • World History - Semester 1

    REGISTER NOW: WORLD HISTORY - SEMESTER 1


    Course Description

    Course Cost: $300.00 - Credit: .5

    Meet with your campus counselor before you register for an online course.

    Course Materials:

    No textbook required.

    Course Description:

    World History Semester One offers students an overview of the history of humankind from the earliest times through the Renaissance. The major emphasis is on the study of significant people, events, and issues. Traditional historical points of reference in world history are identified as students analyze important events and issues in Western civilization as well as in civilizations in other parts of the world. Students evaluate the causes and effects of political and economic imperialism and of major political revolutions.

    Students examine the impact of geographic factors on major historic events and identify the historic origins of contemporary economic systems. Students examine the history and impact of major religious and philosophical traditions. Students analyze the connections between major developments in science and technology and the growth of industrial economies, and they use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple sources of evidence.

    A foundation in history enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nations.

    Detailed Course Syllabus and Correlations to State and National Standards


    REGISTER NOW: WORLD HISTORY - SEMESTER 1

  • World History - Semester 2

    REGISTER NOW: WORLD HISTORY - SEMESTER 2


    Course Description

    Course Cost: $300.00 - Credit: .5

    Meet with your campus counselor before you register for an online course.

    Course Materials:

    No textbook required.

    Course Description:

    The second semester of World History covers the time period from about 1500 to the present. This semester looks at the rise of Western Europe and the impact this rise has on the rest of the world. Students will begin by studying political, cultural, and scientific developments in Europe that result in the creation of centralized nation-states, including the reign of absolute monarchs on the mainland and parliamentary developments in England. These political developments and scientific innovations from the periods known as the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment begin a period of European domination in the Western Hemisphere. Revolutions within Europe trigger drastic political, economic, social, and cultural change beginning in the period of the French Revolution of the late 1700s and continuing through the Industrial Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries. These revolutions spread and become global phenomena to this day.

    A large topic of this semester is European power and domination. Early on this dominance is tested during the revolutionary period. Beginning with the American Revolution and followed by revolutions in the rest of the Americas, European rule is cast aside and unique new nations are born, including the United States. Other areas of the world are not able to forge their own separate identities as European domination continues in the era known as the Age of Imperialism.

    Conflict within Europe in the World Wars of the first half of the 20th century effectively ends the era of unquestioned European dominance. The latter half of this course looks at the causes, features, and impacts of these conflicts. The aftermath of both world wars unleashes new forces like international communism, new currents of nationalism in newly independent areas of Africa and Asia, and a global competition for influence known as the Cold War. Lastly, students will examine current international political and cultural trends that result from the end of the Cold War.

    Detailed Course Syllabus and Correlations to State and National Standards


    REGISTER NOW: WORLD HISTORY - SEMESTER 2